The Baptist Page.net, Functional Bible Translations
Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth on me, though he die, yet shall he live; (Jon 11:15, ASV).

There are several hundred translations of the Holy Bible, which could be good or bad depending on how you look at it. Have you ever wondered why so many translations and what the difference between them is? We did, so we decided to see what we could find out. There are four general types of Biblical translations; literal, paraphrase, thought-for-thought, and those that are a combination of these or just don't fit any particular category. We've tried our best to put the various translations in the proper category (difficult since a word-for-word translation is almost impossible), and for those that we were not able to categorize or that are poor translations we have an "Other" category. Please email us with your comments and, if you can, to fill in some of the blanks, as we'd like to be accurate. Below you'll see what are call "literal" translations of the Bible, although to be honest almost all of them are not. Greek and Hebrew do not directly translate into English, therefore a word-for-word translation is difficult to read and is almost nonsensical at times. Literal in this sense means as literal as possible and still be readable. There are various levels to this of course, so think carefully and pray before choosing your Bible. Each of these has a little something about the translation and how that translation depicts John 3:16 if we could find it. You'll also find a link to some information on the original texts used in translations and other information on our Bible Translation Information page. Please understand that we did not gather most of this information, and that it came from a variety of sources (with permission). Please let us know if you feel anything here is incorrect so we can check it out.

Interested in learning how to translate Scripture yourself? You can find books on how to translate or on eBay.

............Literal.............Thought-For-Thought.............Paraphrase.............Other

1 American King James Version (AKJV) 27 Literal Translation of the Holy Bible, also known as Green’s Literal Translation (LITV) 
2 American Standard Version (ASV) 28 Matthew Bible (MB) 
3 Analytical-Literal Translation (ALT)  29 Modern King James Version (MKJV) 
4 Ancient Roots Translinear Bible (ARTB) 30 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 
5 The Apostles’ Bible (AB) 
6 AV7, The New Authorized Version
31 The New Authorized Version in Present-Day English (AV7) 
7 Beck’s American Translation (BECK) 32 New Cambridge Paragraph Bible (NCPB)
8 Bishops’ Bible, 1568 (Bishops)  33 New King James Version (NKJV) 
9 Brenton’s English Translation of the Septuagint  34 New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)
10 Cambridge Paragraph Bible (NCPB)  35 The Quaker Bible (QB) 
11 Challoner’s revision of the Douay-Rheims Bible  36 Recovery Version of the Bible (RcV)
12 The Common Edition New Testament (TCE)  37 Revised English Bible (REB)
13 The Complete Apostles’ Bible (CAB)  38 Revised Standard Version (RSV)
14 The Complete Jewish Bible (CJB) 39 Rotherham’s English Bible (REB) 
15 A Conservative Version (ACV)  40 Taverner’s Bible 
16 Darby Bible (DBY)  41 Third Millennium Bible 
17 Emphatic Diaglott  42 Thomson’s Translation 
18 English Majority Text Version (EMTV)  43 21st Century King James Version (KJ21) 
19 English Standard Version (ESV)  44 Tyndale Bible 
20 Geneva Bible, 1587 (GB)  45 Updated King James Version (UKJV) 
21 Great Bible or Great Byble (GB)  46 A Voice in the Wilderness Holy Scriptures 
221 Green’s Literal Translation, also known as Literal Translation of the Holy Bible (LITV)  47 Webster Bible, 1833 (WB) 
23 International Standard Version (ISV)  48 World English Bible (WEB) 
24 Julia E. Smith Parker Translation  49 Wuest Expanded Edition (WET) 
25 King James 2000 Version  50 Wyclif’s Bible 
26 King James Version (KJV) 51 Young’s Literal Translation, 1898 (YLT)

19. English Standard Version (ESV) - "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.
Printed in 2001 and a revision of the 1952 Revised Standard. 100+ Publishing team weighed each word against the Hebrew, Aramaic, & Greek to ensure the fullest accuracy & clarity & to avoid under-translating or overlooking any nuance of the original text. This translation was published in 2001, and was translated from the Masoretic Text and a critical Greek New Testament text.

20. Geneva Bible, 1587 (GB) - For God so loued the worlde, that hee hath giuen his onely begotten Sonne, that whosoeuer beleeueth in him, should not perish, but haue euerlasting life.
The Geneva Bible was a Protestant translation of the Bible into English and was the Bible read by William Shakespeare, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of Pilgrim's Progress. It was one of the Bibles brought to America on the Mayflower, and was used by many English Dissenters, and by Oliver Cromwell's soldiers at the time of the English Civil War. Because the language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous, most readers preferred this version strongly over the Bishops' Bible, the translation authorized by the Church of England under Elizabeth I. In the words of Cleland Boyd McAfee, "it drove the Great Bible off the field by sheer power of excellence." This translation was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

21. Great Bible or Great Byble (GB) - John 3:16 not available.
The Great Bible was the first authorized edition of the Bible in English, by King Henry VIII of England The Great Bible was prepared by Myles Coverdale, working under commission of Sir Thomas Cromwell. Although called the Great Bible because of its large size, it is also called the Cromwell Bible, since Thomas Cromwell directed its publication; The Cranmer Bible, since Thomas Cranmer wrote the 1540 preface as well as convinced the King to commission an authorized version. (Cranmer’s preface was also included in the front of the Bishops' Bible); And, the Chained Bible, since it was chained in "some convenient place within the said church." The Great Bible was based on Matthew's Bible. It therefore includes, with very slight revision, the New Testament and the Old Testament portions that had been translated by William Tyndale. The remaining books of the Old Testament had been translated by Coverdale, who used mostly the Latin Vulgate and German translations as sources rather than working from the original Masoretic Greek and Hebrew texts.

22. Green’s Literal Translation, also known as Literal Translation of the Holy Bible (LITV) - For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that everyone believing into Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
A literal translation of the Bible, as the name implies, and printed in 1995, the LITV seeks to more accurately translate the Bible, particularly where names have been mistranslated in the past.

23. International Standard Version (ISV) - "For this is how God loved the world: He gave his unique Son so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but have eternal life.
Using the most ancient manuscripts available, the ISV is considered to be a “literal-idiomatic” translation, in that the translation is literal to the extent that it can be understood. If a literal translation of the text would not be understood by today’s reader, then a more “thought-for-thought” translation is used. Compared to the NASB for its accuracy, the ISV strives to be slightly more readable. The New Testament was released in 1998, with the Old Testament still being translated. This translation is being made from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts.

24. Julia E. Smith Parker Translation - For God so loved the world, that he gave his only born Son, that every one believing in him perish not, but have eternal life.
Published in 1855, the Julia Evelina Smith Parker Translation is considered the first complete translation of the Bible into English by a woman. The work is a strictly literal rendering, always translating a Greek or Hebrew word with the same word wherever possible. She had sought out no help in the venture, even writing, "I do not see that anybody can know more about it than I do." Smith's insistence on complete literalness, combined with an odd notion of Hebrew tenses (often translating the Hebrew imperfect tense with the English future) results in a translation that is mechanical and often nonsensical. This translation was done from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

25. King James 2000 Version (K2K)- For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
A modern language update of the original King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. The purpose of this translation was to update and modernize the original KJV but preserve the KJV as much as possible. This translation was first published in 2000, and was translated by Dr. Robert A. Couric.

26. King James Version (KJV) -  For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
Traditionally loved and accepted by all Christians. Purpose in translation was "to deliver God's book unto God's people in a tongue which they can understand." First published in 1611. Was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

27. Literal Translation of the Holy Bible, also known as Green’s Literal Translation (LITV) - For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that everyone believing into Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
A literal translation of the Bible, as the name implies, the LITV seeks to more accurately translate the Bible, particularly where names have been mistranslated in the past.

28. Matthew Bible (MB or MATT) – John 3:16 not available.
Matthew's Bible was produced by John Rogers, working under the pseudonym "Thomas Matthew" for safety, in 1537. It was based on Tyndale's previously published editions with the addition of his unpublished Old Testament material. The remainder used Coverdale's translation. This version can be considered the beginning of the main sequence of English Bibles, and was from the Masoretic Text, the Textus Receptus, the Vulgate, the Luther Bible, and a French version. It received the approval of Henry VIII, who had previously banned Tyndale's work.

29. Modern King James Version (MKJV) - For God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
The Modern King James Version is identical to the King James Version (KJV), only the translation is done in modern language. First published in 1993, this translation is based on the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

30. New American Standard Bible (NASB) - "For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life.
A highly respected, literal, formal translation of the Bible. First published in 1971 and updated in 1995, the purpose of the work was to update the American Standard Version (ASV) into more current English. The ASV is rooted in the work that was done with the Revised Version (RV), which was a revised version of the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. This is the personal favorite translation of the admin of this site.

31. The New Authorized Version in Present-Day English (AV7) - For God so loved the world, that He gave His Only Begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have eternal life.
AKA AV7, this translation follows the traditional English text (KJV) closely, but does so in modern grammatically correct English. Where corrections are made to the text documentation is there to explain the correction, and is interesting in that the translation is checked with a computer to ensure consistent translation of words and phrases. For more see their WEBSITE.

32. New Cambridge Paragraph Bible (NCPB) - John 3:16 not available.
First published in 2005, the New Cambridge Paragraph Bible (NCPB), is a revision of the Cambridge Paragraph Bible, which was a revision of the King James Bible, which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

33. New King James Version (NKJV) - For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
A modern language update of the original King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. The purpose of this translation was to update and modernize the original KJV but preserve the KJV as much as possible. This translation was first published in 1982.

34. New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) - For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.
The NRSV is published in three versions: The standard edition (Protestant Canon); with the Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical books in addition to the Old and New Testaments; and the Catholic Edition that contains the Old Testament in the order of the Vulgate. First published in 1989, the NRSV is a revision of the Revised Standard Version (RSV), which is a revision of the American Standard Version (ASV), which is rooted in the work that was done with the Revised Version (RV), which was a revised version of the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

35. The Quaker Bible (APQB or QB) - John 3:16 not available.
Published in 1764, the Quaker Bible was translated by Anthony Purver who was a Quaker (hence the name). This literal translation translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus never quite caught on for several reasons. One was that Purver was self-taught and when unable to translate a particular passage, he would lock himself in a room and wait for inspiration. Also, there were errors in his work and he was unable to obtain financial backing to do more than get an initial few published.

36. Recovery Version of the Bible (RcV)- For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that every one who believes into Him would not perish, but have eternal life.
With the complete Bible published in 1999, the Recovery Version of the Bible (RcV) is published by Living Stream Ministries, which is the publishing arm of a group know as “The Local Church,” headed by Watchman Nee and Witness Lee. A literal translation, the RcV is a revision of the American Standard Version (ASV), which is rooted in the work that was done with the Revised Version (RV), which was a revised version of the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

37. Revised English Bible (REB) - God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that everyone who has faith in him may not perish but have eternal life.The Revised English Bible (REB) was first published in 1989. The REB is a paraphrase translation, and has been criticized for using gender-neutral language at times. The REB is a revision of the New English Bible (NEB), which was translated from critical versions of the Masoretic Text and the Greek New Testament.

38. Revised Standard Version (RSV) - For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.
Published in several editions, including both Protestant and Catholic, the RSV was the first serious challenge to the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. With the New Testament appearing in 1946 and the Old Testament in 1952, the RSV is a revision of the American Standard Version (ASV), which is rooted in the work that was done with the Revised Version (RV), which was a revised version of the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. The Nestle-Anand Greek New Testament was used also.


Google
 

Literal Bible Translations

Which Bible translation should I choose?

Page 2
Copyright 2006-2013 TheBaptistPage.net. All Rights Reserved. Questions? Comments? See About Us, Statement of Faith, or FAQ's for more info or contact the Webmaster.

The Baptist Page.net is a part of the Infilled Network

The BaptistTop1000.com
The Best Baptist Web Sites at Baptist411.com

BaptistAdvance.com :: Helping Baptists promote their web site

Like us on Facebook and Google +1!