The Baptist Page.net, Unreliable or Unusual Bible Translations
For everyone who asks receives. And he who seeks finds. And to him who knocks it shall be opened (Luk 11:10, MKJV).

There are several hundred translations of the Holy Bible, which could be good or bad depending on how you look at it. Have you ever wondered why so many translations and what the difference between them is? We did, so we decided to see what we could find out. There are four general types of Biblical translations; literal, paraphrase, thought-for-thought, and those that are a combination of these or just don't fit any particular category. We've tried our best to put the various translations in the proper category (difficult since a word-for-word translation is almost impossible), and for those that we were not able to categorize or that are poor translations we have an "Other" category, which is what this particular page is about. Please email us with your comments and, if you can, to fill in some of the blanks, as we'd like to be accurate. Below you'll see links to pages that include the different types of translations (literal, thought-for-thought, paraphrase, or other) and a listing of the translations we've categorized as "other" that we have looked at so far below that. Click on the links to find out more about the translation and how that translation depicts John 3:16. You'll also find a link to some information on the original texts used in translations and other information on our Bible Translation Information page. Please understand that we did not gather most of this information, and that it came from a variety of sources (with permission). Please let us know if you feel anything here is incorrect so we can check it out.

Interested in learning how to translate Scripture yourself? You can find books on how to translate or on eBay.

............Literal.............Thought-For-Thought.............Paraphrase.............Other

1. Anchor Bible 10. James Murdock New Testament (JMNT)
2. The Bible in Living English 11.Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible
3. The Clear Word 12. Lamsa Bible, formally known as The Holy Bible from Ancient Eastern Manuscripts (LBP) 
4. Contemporary English Bible (CEV) 13. New Interpreters’ Study Bible (NISB)
5. Cotton Patch Gospel (CPG) 14. New World Translation (NWT)
6. Douay-Rheims Bible, 1610 (D-R) 15. Revised Version (RV)
7. English Jubilee 2000 Bible (Jubilee 2000) 16. The Story Bible (TSB)
8. Ferrar Fenton Bible 17. Weymouth New Testament, 1912 (WNT)
9. Holy Scriptures Version (HSV)

1. Anchor Bible – John 3:16 not available.
With each book of the Bible translated and annotated by a different scholar, the Anchor Bible is unique. Published in a series that thus far has seen 38 out of 66 volumes, with the Book of Genesis the first published in 1964, Protestant, Jewish, and Catholic scholars have been a part of the translating team of the series. One criticism is that the series seems to be aimed at Biblical scholars, with the common reader left out of the equation. Extensive footnotes and other information make the reading of this text more than the average reader would want or need, but none-the-less the intent is to keep the anchor series as up-to-date as possible with new archeological findings as they come to light.

2. The Bible in Living English – John 3:16 not available.
This translation is printed by the Watchtower Society (Jehovah’s Witness). After the death of the author, Steven Byington, in 1957, the Watchtower Society bought the rights to this translation, but did not publish it until 1972.

3. The Clear Word (CWP) - For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son to come here and die, that whoever believes in Him will not perish but will have eternal life.
A paraphrased translation that has been published by the Seventh-Day Adventists beginning in 1994, it has received much criticism, with the translators accused of “bending” the Scriptures to fit the pre-existing Adventist doctrine.

4. Contemporary English Version (CEV) - God loved the people of this world so much that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who has faith in him will have eternal life and never really die.
Written with an elementary-school reading level, the CEV is readable and understandable for the modern reader. Published in 1995, the CEV is more of a thought-for-thought translation of the scriptures, and can better be thought of as a paraphrase of the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. It has been criticized for using gender inclusive language and scripture was changed somewhat so that they could ensure no anti-Semitism (politically correct in other words). If you use this translation, use it with caution.

5. Cotton Patch Gospel or Cotton Patch Version (CPG or CPV) - God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, that whoever trusts him might not die, but might have spiritual life.
This translation is not scripture, and should not be taken as such. None-the-less, the aim of this work is to take the New Testament and change the places and other facts to try to make it more understandable to the African-American community, and is interesting for that reason. Written by Clarence Jordan, four volumes were published over the years 1968-1973.

6. Douay-Rheims Bible, 1610 (D-R) - For God so loved the world, as to give his only begotten Son: that whosoever believeth in him may not perish, but may have life everlasting.
The Douay-Rheims Bible is a translation of the Bible from the Latin Vulgate into English. The New Testament was published in one volume with extensive commentary and notes in 1582. The Old Testament followed in 1609–10 in two volumes, also extensively annotated, with the notes taking up the bulk of the volumes. These notes offered insights on issues of translation, and on the Hebrew and Greek source texts of the Vulgate. The purpose of the version, both the text and notes, was to uphold Catholic tradition in the face of the Protestant Reformation which was heavily influencing England. This English translation is from the Vulgate.

7. English Jubilee 2000 Bible (Jubilee 2000) - John 3:16 not available.
Interesting in that throughout this translation reference is made as to how the scriptures relate to the African-American experience, this translation was made from Spanish into English by Russell Martin Stendal and compared with the Early Modern English translation of William Tyndale, and was also compared word for word with the King James Version (KJV). The Spanish translation was translated from the original texts in Biblical Hebrew and Greek into Spanish by Casiodoro de Reina (1569) and compared with the revision of Cipriano de Valera (1602). Based on the New Testament of Francisco de Enzinas (1543) and on the New Testament (1556) with the Psalms (1557) of Juan Perez de Pineda.

8. Ferrar Fenton Bible (FFB) – For God so loved the world that He gave the only-begotten Son, so that every one believing in Him should not be lost, but have eternal life.
With it’s first complete Bible printed in 1903, the Ferrar Fenton translation is unique in that the author, Ferrar Fenton, rearranged the books of the Bible in the chronological order he believed they occurred. This put, for example, the Gospel of John and the Epistle of John in front of Matthew. Also, the Name of God throughout the Old Testament is translated as “The Ever-Living.” The translation of the New Testament is based on the Greek text of Westcott and Hort, and the Old Testament from the Masoretic Text.

9. Holy Scriptures Version (HSV or RVT) - John 3:16 not available.
First published in 2001 by translator Vincent Rabon Jr., the Holy Scriptures Version (HSV) is based on the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. This translation has received some criticism because the translator doesn’t speak any of the original languages of the Bible, and made his translations using a computer program. There is also some criticism that there is a denominational bias towards the Church of Christ teachings. This translation has not seen a lot of distribution.

10. James Murdock New Testament (JMNT) - For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on him, should not perish, but should have life eternal.
New Testament translation into English from the Syriac Peshito Version of the New Testament, which was originally written in Aramaic around the second century.

11. Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible - For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
First published in 1830, with revisions as late as 1844, Joseph Smith founded Mormonism with this translation. Based primarily on the King James Version (KJV), Smith made many additions, subtractions, and changes to the text through “inspired” translation. A sacred text to Mormonism, it is none-the-less generally held in low esteem by Biblical scholars.

12. Lamsa Bible, formally known as The Holy Bible from Ancient Eastern Manuscripts (LBP or GLP) - For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have eternal life.
Published in 1933, the Lamsa Bible was translated from the Syriac Peshitta by George M. Lamsa, which is the Bible used by the Assyrian Church of the East and other Syriac Christian traditions. In some areas of the Bible this translation differs greatly from other English-language Bibles, and this should be kept in mind when reading.

13. New Interpreters’ Study Bible (NISB) – John 3:16 not available.
First published in 2003 and published with the Apocrypha, the New Interpreters’ Study Bible (NISB) includes the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible (NRSV) which is a revision of the Revised Standard Version (RSV), which is a revision of the American Standard Version (ASV), which is rooted in the work that was done with the Revised Version (RV), which was a revised version of the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. It also includes commentary and articles about the text.

14. New World Translation (NWT) – For God loved the world so much that he gave his only-begotten Son, in order that everyone exercising faith in him might not be destroyed but have everlasting life.
This translation is printed by the Watchtower Society (Jehovah’s Witness), and is regarded by some Biblical scholars as having been taken from the original texts, then changed to fit the JW’s pre-existing theology. For example, John 1:1 in this translation was changed so that it doesn’t refer to Jesus Christ is God.

15. Revised Version (RV or ERV) - For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on him should not perish, but have eternal life.
The Revised Version (or English Revised Version) of the Bible is a late 19th-century British revision of the King James Version of 1611, which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.. The New Testament was published in 1881, the Old Testament in 1885, and the Apocrypha in 1894. The stated aim of the RV's translators was "to adapt King James' version to the present state of the English language without changing the idiom and vocabulary," and "to adapt it to the present standard of Biblical scholarship." Unfortunately since this issue had no copyright protection it was corrupted by publishers and those with a bias almost immediately.

16. The Story Bible (TSB) - John 3:16 not available.
First appearing in 1971 and written by Pearl S. Buck, the Story Bible is a children’s Bible that only tells the stories in the Old and New Testament in a way to reach children. Criticized somewhat because of this, the Story Bible used the King James Version as its basis, then told the stories in modern English.

17. Weymouth New Testament (WNT) - For so greatly did God love the world that He gave His only Son, that every one who trusts in Him may not perish but may have the Life of Ages.
Written by Richard Francis Weymouth and first published in 1903, the aim was to discover how the inspired writers themselves would have expressed and described the events of the New Testament and Gospels, had they been actually writing in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Cannot truly be called a translation.


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