The Baptist Page.net, Dynamic Bible Translations
"For by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned (Mat 12:37, NASB)."

There are several hundred translations of the Holy Bible, which could be good or bad depending on how you look at it. Have you ever wondered why so many translations and what the difference between them is? We did, so we decided to see what we could find out. There are four general types of Biblical translations; literal, paraphrase, thought-for-thought, and those that are a combination of these or just don't fit any particular category. We've tried our best to put the various translations in the proper category (difficult since a word-for-word translation is almost impossible), and for those that we were not able to categorize or that are poor translations we have an "Other" category. On this page you will find translations that have been categorized as "thought-for-thought" translations, although to some extent almost ALL translations are thought-for-thought. This is because Greek and Hebrew do not translate well into English. Please email us with your comments and, if you can, to fill in some of the blanks, as we'd like to be accurate. Below you'll see links to pages that include the different types of translations (literal, thought-for-thought, paraphrase, or other) and a listing of the translations we have looked at so far below that. Click on the links to find out more about the translation and how that translation depicts John 3:16. You'll also find a link to some information on the original texts used in translations and other information on our Bible Translation Information page. Please understand that we did not gather most of this information, and that it came from a variety of sources (with permission). Please let us know if you feel anything here is incorrect so we can check it out.

Interested in learning how to translate Scripture yourself? You can find books on how to translate or on eBay.

............Literal.............Thought-For-Thought.............Paraphrase.............Other

1 Amplified Bible (AMP)  9 New English Bible (NEB)
2 Berkeley Version (BV)  10 New English Translation (NET)
3 Bible in Basic English, 1965 (BBE)  11 New International Reader’s Version (NIRV)
4 God’s Word Bible (GW)  12 New International Version (NIV) 
5 Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB) 13 New International Version Inclusive Language Edition (NIVI)
6 The Modern Language Bible, also known as the New Berkeley Version (MLB) 14 Restored Name King James Version (RNKJV)
7 Moffatt, New Translation (MNT) 15 Revised English Bible (REB)
8 The New Berkeley Version, also known as the Modern Language Bible (MLB) 16 Today’s New International Version

1. Amplified Bible (AMP) - For God so greatly loved and dearly prized the world that He [even] gave up His only begotten (unique) Son, so that whoever believes in (trusts in, clings to, relies on) Him shall not perish (come to destruction, be lost) but have eternal (everlasting) life.
A popular translation used to understand the hidden meaning of Greek and Hebrew words. Published in 1964 (updated in 1987). This translation is a revision of the American Standard Version (ASV), which is rooted in the work that was done with the Revised Version (RV), which was a revised version of the King James Version.

2. Berkeley Version (BV) – For God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
First published in 1958, the Berkeley Version was an attempt to make a translation of the scriptures in modern English. This translation was done from the Masoretic Text, the Textus Receptus, and was compared to other translations for verification of the translation.

3. Bible in Basic English (BBE) - For God had such love for the world that he gave his only Son, so that whoever has faith in him may not come to destruction but have eternal life.
More of a “thought-for-thought” translation, the Bible In Basic English is a translation of the Bible into “Basic” English. Can best be considered a paraphrase of the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. The BBE was translated by Professor S. H. Hooke using the standard 850 Basic English words. 100 words that were helpful to understand poetry were added along with 50 "Bible" words. The New Testament was released in 1941 and the Old Testament was released in 1949.

4. God’s Word Bible (GW) - God loved the world this way: He gave his only Son so that everyone who believes in him will not die but will have eternal life.
Using a linguistically based translation method, the work on God's Word was done by a denominationally diverse, 75-member team of translators, linguists, English experts, and independent biblical-language scholars. Published in 1995, the GW can be considered a “thought-for-thought” translation that was taken from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts.

5. Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB) - "For God loved the world in this way: He gave His One and Only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him will not perish but have eternal life.
First published in 2004, and 20 years in the making, the HCSB is the work of 100 interdenominational scholars collaborating with the benefit of the latest breakthroughs in Bible scholarship. This translation uses a critical version of the Masoretic Text and the Nestle-Aland Text, and uses a literal form of translation when possible, and a thought-for-thought form of translation when the literal isn’t as clear as it could be.

6. The Modern Language Bible, also known as the New Berkeley Version (MLB or NBV) – For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
First published in 1969, this revision of the Berkeley Version included changes only to the New Testament. This translation was done from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

7. Moffatt, New Translation (MNT) - For God loved the world so dearly that he gave up his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may have eternal life, instead of perishing.
Moffatt, New Translation is an abbreviation of the title, "The Holy Bible Containing the Old and New Testaments, a New Translation" by James Moffatt. This is a translation from the original Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic. Moffatts’ intention was to make clear in the translation things that might be misunderstood when looked at through the eyes of modern culture.

8. The New Berkeley Version, also known as the Modern Language Bible (MLB) – For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
First published in 1969, this revision of the Berkeley Version included changes only to the New Testament. This translation was done from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

9. New English Bible (NEB) - God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, that everyone who has faith in him may not die but have eternal life.
With the New Testament published in 1961 and the Old Testament published in 1970, the New English Bible (NEB) was translated using critical versions of the Masoretic Text and the Greek New Testament (with some Latin in the Apocrypha). This translation is a “thought-for-thought” work rather than a literal translation, and is somewhat controversial.

10. New English Translation (NET) - For this is the way God loved the world: He gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.
The NET Bible is a free, on-line English translation of the Bible, sponsored by the Biblical Studies Foundation. Based on the Masoretic Text and the Greek New Testament and first made available in November of 2005, the translation itself claims to be non-sectarian and evangelical. The translation is most notable for an immense number of lengthy footnotes (which often explain its textual translation decision), its open translation process, its availability on the Internet, and its open copyright permitting free downloads and use for ministry purposes.

11. New International Reader’s Version (NIRV) - "God loved the world so much that he gave his one and only Son. Anyone who believes in him will not die but will have eternal life.
Written at a fourth grade reading level and in even simpler language than the New International Version (NIV), the NIRV is directed at those who have trouble reading English. There are more headings than most translations, and if a verse refers to another part of the Bible a notation will tell you where that is. Definitions are also given for words that might be hard to understand. One controversy about this translation is its gender-inclusive language. This translation is based on the NIV, which is translated from critical versions of the Masoretic Text and the Greek New Testament.

12. New International Version (NIV) - "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.
A best-selling translation widely accepted by evangelical Christians, there is none-the-less some criticism of this translation. Purpose in translation was to "produce an accurate translation, suitable for public and private reading, teaching, preaching, memorizing, and liturgical use." Criticisms are mainly a lack of focus on Christ's diety, but others who read it disagree with this. First published in 1978, this translation is translated from critical versions of the Masoretic Text and the Greek New Testament.

13. New International Version Inclusive Language Edition (NIVI) - John 3:16 not available.
The NIVI is an updated version of the NIV, with the rather major difference of its use of gender-neutral language. Published in London, it is not generally available in the United States.

14. Restored Name King James Version (RNKJ) – For YHWH so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
The Restored Name King James Version is a revision of the King James Bible which uses the Hebrew tetragrammaton YHWH for the name of God. It is an undated online version that is based on the Holy Name Bible text of the Scripture Research Association as modified by the individual hosting the website. According to the editor, The main sources that were used for editing this version were: The Holy Name Bible, by the Scripture Research Association; The Scriptures, by the Institute for Scripture Research; The ExeGesis, by Herb Jahn; and the New Englishman's Hebrew Concordance, by George V. Wigram.

15. Revised English Bible (REB) - God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that everyone who has faith in him may not perish but have eternal life.
The Revised English Bible (REB) was first published in 1989. The REB has been criticized for using gender-neutral language at times and is a revision of the New English Bible (NEB), which was translated from critical versions of the Masoretic Text and the Greek New Testament.

16. Today’s New International Version - For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.
A revision of the New International Version (NIV), but not a replacement, the TNIV was written to make the scriptures even easier to read and understand than that of the NIV. It has been criticized for being gender-neutral and a lack of focus on Christ's diety in the translation however. First published in 2002, this translation is translated from critical versions of the Masoretic Text and the Greek New Testament.


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